Veterans Employment Program Hits 500 Jobs

More than 500 veterans have found jobs in the NSW public sector with the assistance of the Veterans Employment Program (VEP), exceeding the Government’s target by 162 per cent and 18 months ahead of schedule.

Baulkham Hills State Liberal MP and Minister for Veterans Affairs David Elliott today released the results of an 18-month report card on the VEP, which found 523 veterans had successfully transitioned their military skills into a variety of civilian roles in the public service.

“I am incredibly proud of this program which was the first of its kind in Australia and has since been adopted by Victoria and at the Commonwealth level, helping to secure the future of veterans across the country,” Mr Elliott said.

“We made an election commitment in 2015 that 200 veterans would be placed in public sector roles by 2019. This report shows we have smashed that target.”

The results of the 18-month report revealed the NSW Government exceeded its target by 162 per cent.

“Veterans are demonstrating their value in roles not traditionally associated with former military personnel. This broadening of employment options is exciting for job-seeking veterans, and it’s exciting for NSW to see the difference veterans can make in our communities,” Mr Elliott said.

VEP Manager, Garth Callender, who has served multiple tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, said the program had assisted employers to understand what skills veterans bring to the workplace. All managers who employed a veteran had rated it as a positive experience.

“The message is getting out there. Our veterans have strong leadership and teamwork capabilities, excel in critical thinking and problem solving and are change management experts – exactly the skills companies today deem are most lacking in their organisations,” Mr Callendar said.

Former Royal Australian Air Force officer Jacqueline Grady said she used the VEP to understand how to transfer her military skills to a civilian career and now works as an Exhibitions Researcher at the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park.

Former Army Engineer Paul Rindermann, now a Court Escort Officer, said, “It is only when I left the ADF that I appreciated the level of comradery we have. It is important veterans manage their expectations and make use of those networks after they leave to help with their transition.”

Visit vep.veterans.nse.gov.au to find out more about the program.